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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  March 19, 2014 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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we got a lot of great tweets about your favorite infomercials. larry says the ultimate
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infomercial has to be the shake weight. and miss cleo was at the popular for her predictions. to "morning joe" right now! good morning. it's wednesday, march 19th. welcome to "morning joe." beautiful shot of new york. ilt so dark in the morning these days. with us on set we have msnbc contributor mike barnicle. are you and thomas dressed the same today in. >> no, no. >> thomas roberts is racing down the hall. look at him. okay. very nice. >> okay. >> right on time! speaking of fantastic, fantastic style, the host of politics national and president of the action network, may i please see
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the glasses, the reverend al sharpton and host of andrea mitchell reports, andrea mitchell joins us. we have major updates on ukraine and really disturbing video out of thereof. and senior political editor and white house correspondent for "the huffington post," sam klein. >> we now know however changed the flight plan on board the missing jet was experienced. >> still the u-turn could reflect the pilot's alternate route in case of an emergency
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and doesn't necessarily mean something more sinister at play, with a search area more than 2 million nautical miles. a huge portion of that is in the southern indian ocean. southwest of australia where american aircraft are combing through rough waters for any sign of debris. the area is too big for underwater sonar. much of the focus remains on the pilot and first officer. officials say nothing suspicious turned up in the home of either men. we begin there and try and branch out just like investigators. >> joining us is greg. i guess the biggest development is knowing this was planned in the 12 minutes before the u-turn. what does that tell us and what does it not tell us? >> i think you characterize it
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right, mika. the problem is is that pilots will typically put an malt nat flight plan into the flight management system. the fact that this airplane made a turn after the lath communication and there was a change in direction, we're not sure if that was one of those things programmed in as an emergency or some alternate flight plan to take the airplane possibly to the south indian ocean. >> okay. it still, though, a massive span to look for. i know it's difficult for someone who does what you do have a theory because you're supposed to keep your mind open but when you heard the news last night and this latest development, where did your mind go? >> again, i try to keep an open mind. one of those things is that if this is all premeditated, it obvious this person, whoever was in control of the aircraft,
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didn't want to be seen, didn't want to be tracked and was taking this airplane to a point where no one was going to find it. this is just one more piece of that puzzle. we get some very scant information from the malaysians. it's difficult to piece what is fact or factoid and put it into a storyline and it very difficult as an accident investigator to do that when what we have. >> for people who are doing this and scratching their head with how they switch or how they adapt, is this just showing the officials are not the sharpest ones to be at the top of this? >> when it comes to the way the malaysians were handling it, they thought they could handle an investigation like this. they were going to show the world we can play with the biggest of accident investigation groups like the united states. and they found very quickly this
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is a very daunting, overwhelming task and unfortunately all the assets they're bringing it now from all these various countries should have been brought in in the first days. now as the days pass, i'm not very confident that they're going to find what we're looking for. >> greg, the reality is at this point this is a search story i would think. let's give people some indication of the scope of the search. is it not accurate to say that the search operation being conducted for this plane is basically similar to planes and ships trying to find a single plane parked underwater somewhere in a territory the size of the united states? >> that's a very good characterization. you know, i could put that airplane anywhere in the united states and then say go find it.
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it is a daunting task. when you're talking about 28 million square miles of water they're looking at -- especially with the ocean. the ocean is different. it is vast and changing all the time. you could search an area and find there's no wreckage there only have to debris float back in there. >> the fact is a lot focusses on the pilot. you had said to me it could have been one pilot if either of them were involved, that had programmed the computer while the other one was circling around the plane, getting ready, doing his regular security check. it would not necessarily mean
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both. and in some cases the other one wouldn't have known what one had done before they took their seat in the cockpit. >> that's correct, reverend. the big thing here is that one of the pilots could have programmed both flight plans and then when the other pilot returned to the cockpit and asked is it ready to go? yes, we have the flight plans and then they'll put it up on their primary flight plans and we're good to go. >> i'll end this part of this news segment because we have other big news to get to with news information from the malaysian officials. according to malaysian officials, the pilot they were looking at who they found a flight simulator at his home, they found he had information deleted off of his simulator. they're trying to find if there
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was anything -- >> they say that they're trying to retrieve the files recently deleted and they say they're giving it their best effort. obviously, though, adding to this, the defense minister said the pilot is proven -- innocent until proven guilty. again, deleted files on the pilot's flight simulator, the one he had at his home. they're trying to retrieve those files. we'll look into that more. greg feith, if you need to come bark we'll bring you back. we have to get to ukraine now. russian president vladimir putin wasted no time in taking a
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victory lap following crimea's annexation to russia. if the sanctions put forth by president obama the day before made any impact, you couldn't see it. joe biden made a whirl wind tour of eastern europe visiting latvia and poland. when the president of poland questioned -- >> while others may not have stood up to their responsibilities, the united states has more than stood up to their responsibilities. we have a budget larger than the next ten nations combined so
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don't worry where we are. >> ewant to ask you about biden's promises, completely flying in the face of any sanctions that might have come forward yesterday. i guess we're going to see more sanctions or if the sanctions need more time to be felt? then we'll get to the disturbing video. >> first of all, i think the u.s. sanctions so far were the least the president could have done. he as authorized tougher sanctions and now that putin has made it clear this is a fate accompli, they have to step it up and they not only rejected the sanctions but they derided them. there were tweets talking about comrade barack obama and
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ridiculing the efforts. putin was strident in two speeches and absolutely declared that crimea had always been part of russia, needed to be part of russia, was always part a russia, said that the u.s. and nato had cheated over and over given. he derided the united states and nato and the west complaining particularly saying that nato was on his borders say they go had lied and cheated. it was the most sort of over-the-top, cold war sounding speech that many people had heard. michael hall said this was very surprising and didn't indicate any possibility to step down. he is promising stepped up nato exercises. that's what we are told they're going to do is show the strength of nato.
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there is money there in that budget. >> andrea, i have two vnc.o.s t get to. in crimia gunmen dressed in russian military uniforms stormed a military base, killing one soldier. ukraine's defense minister authorized soldiers to use live ammunition in self-defense. and sam stein, clearly this is just the beginning. >> this is just the beginning. it's interesting that no one in the united states has called for any u.s. military personnel to be sent to draw a line. there have been some critics of the president's policy who have called for more military assistance to be sent to the ukraine. i'm wondering of how long it
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would take to get the military assistance to ukraine and what form it would come in and what good it would do. >> what they were talking about with john mccain is that the u.s. congress has not even agreed on sanctions and on the economic aid and they left with recess with senate and house disagreement. the house passed one bill but there were provisions in it on the imf that democratic-led senators won't agree with. so on even that minor piece the senate and house can't greagree. >> elsewhere we have according to very disturbing video posted online, i actually watched the entire part of this, it's frightening. it's about six minutes long. far right members of a ukrainian
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nationalist party with be seen storming a state-run tv station, assaulting and terrorizing the ceo, forcing him to resign. they forced him of using the station to campaign for moscow. nbc has not confirmed the authenticity of the video. you get a sense of the complexity of this. barnicle, what happened with the sanctions yesterday but also this, quote, vote, to annex, secede, separate crimea from you've crane? >> it's an incredibly del situation situation for the united states, as well as the ukraine. one of the things that came to mind just watching that video is clearly the white house and secretary of state are involved in climbing the ladder in sanctions, there will be tougher sanctions down the road. but what do you hear about the problem within the problem? crimea is basically gone. that's not coming back. but the problem within the
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problem is how do we keep ukraine out of starting a hot war, a shooting war? >> these last two incidents, first of all, what happened yesterday in crimea, the capital of crimea, another person was injured as well and now we're hearing reports that other ukrainian soldiers are being forced out of their base, that basically the russian takeover of crimea is being completed. and i don't know how you stop the tension. so far the ukrainian acting leaders have been very restrained and they have to defend themselves at some point. the theory is that putin will not move farther into eastern ukraine if there are economic sanctions and if europeans stand up to him but so far that has not deterred him, at least has not rhetorically deterred him. it remains to be seen whether he
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stands down or realizes he'll be taking on a big challenge or mess for himself if he took over the rest of ukraine. >> doesn't this show the delicate balance the president and the united states has to reach when you weigh what may have happened to intimidate people around the vote, when you way now whether putin is going to run hot or cold on any given day, i mean, don't we have to read as we go rather than jump all in as some are suggesting are jump more in like mccain and others are suggesting. isn't it too delicate to switch that far in advance? >> the point u make is we don't know what's in putin's attention. there are big american interests
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as well. exxon/mobile. rachel maddow pointed out a contract signed with the biggest oil company signed in the vladimir putin's living room in sochi. so he is so deeply involved in all of these economic -- >> can you believe sochi at this point? seriously, can you all believe sochi at this point? >> i can't. i couldn't watch. >> the president of russia is going on this major testosterone burst with sochi -- >> you mean letting 150,000 people die? right. let's talk about who we're talking about here and have an honest conversation. actually, we're having a report on putin that we will air twice in this show. we'll figure it out because we need to really look at -- americans really need to look at
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who we're dealing with here. they saw the olympics and if they tuned out, they're not getting the whole story. >> i have a follow-up to the story we reported on yesterday. it's the politics of equal pay. >> texas. >> let's go to texas, andrea. it continues to be a headache for republicans in the state of texas. yesterday executive director of texas, or texas republican party, looked to clarify her party's stance on the issue. he hemmed and hauwed and talked about how women were too busy. she said "men are better negotiators. i would encourage women instead of pursuing the courts for action to become better negotiators." .
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>> who is she -- this is -- >> this is another woman -- i will be self-serving here and said i wrote a book on negotiating. that has nothing to do with the pathetic way that women are paid compared to their male counterparts and there does need to be an investigation and if anybody has a better idea, come to the table with it. otherwise, would i be quiet. i would. no offense. but it's not helping you at all be a winning party that actually wants to bring women in and be included. even if you don't mean it, i suggest as a pr campaign, make sure you act like you do. this comes after a very awkward interview by the head of red state women, a republican super pac aimed at recruiting female
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voters. kerry christman attempts to explain greg abbott's position on lilly ledbetter law on equal pay. >> if you look at it, women are extremely busy. we lead busy lives whether we're working professionally, working from home and times are extrooemly busy. it's a busy cycle for women and we've got a lot to juggle. so when we rook at this issue we think what's practical and we want more access to jobs, we want to bible to go to great higher education degree at the same time that we're working or raising a family. there's common sense. we believe that real world solution is a more practical way to approach the problem. >> oh, my god. >> what do you think, andrea? >> i think i'm very busy.
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>> i'm busy, too. i've got to put on my lipstick. >> don't pay me more. i'm too busy. i want to get a higher education degree while i work here. >> the lilly ledbetter act doesn't require people to pay equal wages. it said you'll get more avenues to sue for equal wages. i don't know what time constraints have to do with the act. this goes back several years now, if you remember during the 2012 campaign, mitt romney's campaign had difficulty explaining where he stood on the act. the republican party needs to figure out -- because this is not some side issue. its issue of economic fairness, economic justice and it's pervasive. this is going to be an issue across the campaign, not just in
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texas. >> i hate to come off as cold or whatever. what frustrates me is this is such a basic issue and it's an issue that republicans could win on, that they need. this and other health issues pertaining to women, they're so easy. >> and you've got more. >> some looking at you, mika would call you a whiner. >> i'm a whiner, really? better than a biotch. >> andrea kiefer said we are losing the respect that we so dearly want in the workplace, almost making us look like whiners. >> oh, my lord.
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>> they talk about you need to negotiate better, that we're busy. they never address the real issue, that women are making 77 cent to every dollar of men. i think they insult the public by evading the issue. >> and it doesn't report to the fact that there's been sort of a mancession and a lot of women are the only one bringing money into a household, doing it alone. this is rife with so many ways the republican party could help address some of the issues that challenge our society. >> and if they got the same pay, maybe they wouldn't have to be so busy. >> right. there's that. >> why are these important women stepping up and defending paying women 77 cents an hour to a
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man's dollar. >> i would invite anyone who has a better idea to come on the show. we're calling joe biden, who has been very active on this, i invite anyone to come and challenge them on them. we're working on those bookings this week. this is something we shouldn't let go. if the republicans who have made these comments would like to come in and clarify and fill a missed opportunity, they are welcome here. i would love to have the conversation, i would love to hear something positive. >> coming up on "morning joe," senator dick durbin, we'll talk to peter orszag and chuck todd joins us. which women are really calling the shots in the nation's capital.
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and how are they getting paid, by the way? but first dylan dreyer with a check on the forecast. >> good morning, mika. spring starts tomorrow and we're going to try to make a run for it to feel like it. it's raining in chicago. that could make for a little bit of a messy morning commute just with the extra water on the roadways this morning. we do still have winter weather advisories in effect across parts of eastern minnesota into northwestern wisconsin, where an additional 1 to 3 inches could fall. then it moves into central and northern new england, about 3 to 6 inches in central new england, 6 to 12 a little further north. temperatures should be in the 40s and tomorrow i'd say this feels pretty spring-like. we'll see sunshine in the
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northeast and temperatures should finally get into the 50s. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. ♪ ♪ salesperson #1: the real deal's the passat tdi clean diesel gets up to 795 highway miles per tank. salesperson #2: actually, we're throwing in a $1,000 fuel reward card. we've never done that. that's why there's never been a better time to buy a passat tdi clean diesel. husband: so it's like two deals in one? avo: during the salesperson #2: first ever exactly. volkswagen tdi clean diesel event, get a great deal on a passat tdi, that gets up to 795 highway miles per tank. and get a $1000 dollar fuel reward card. it's like two deals in one. hurry in and get a $1,000 fuel reward card and 0.9% apr for 60 months on tdi models.
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well, knowing gives you confidence. start building your confident retirement today. time now to take a look at the "morning papers." the "seattle times," investigators are trying to figure out what caused a news helicopter to crash on the street. two were killed and one was badly hurt. >> and "the "detroit free
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press"" saying gm should have warned of the faulty ignition switch. 12 people have died in crashes linked to the issue. >> "the new orleans times-picayune" says edwin edwards will run for congress. >> i've given a great deal of thought to this. i've read articles from people who suggest what i should and shouldn't do and i acknowledge that there are good reasons why i should not run.
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but there are better reasons why i should and good reasons have to give way to better reasons. therefore, i will be a candidate for congress for the sixth congressional district this year. >> he's going to need votes because he can't vote for himself, right? >> right, he's a convicted felon. >> we should cover this race. we need more people in politics like ed edwards, he has a 36-year-old wife, his third marriage, go ed edwards. >> "the washington post" is out with new reporting on the nsa's eavesdropping facility. according to "the washington post," they have a system capable of listening in on 100% of calls for up to a month after
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they're recorded. a senior manager at the agency compares the expansive program to a time machine. and that ties into the top story in this morning's political playbook. joining us now for political, mike allen. i guess you've got news on this. rand paul headed to u.c. berkeley about the nsa and privacy concerns. a preview? >> that's right. berkeley could be a tough crowd for rand paul but he's taking a smart subject. he's taking on the nsa. but we have an exclusive. he's going beyond that. he's going to attack for the first time the u.s. intelligence more broadly, specifically he's going to name the cia, he's going to say that senators have a fear of an intelligence community that rand wall will say is drunk with power, unrepent eant and uninclined to
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relinquish power. he will say he's worried and not sure who is in charge of this government. so much he's making very strong and wide charges about the strength of the intelligence community. something that might ple well in berkeley. >> we'll hear more what he has to say. i want to update louisiana, that state does allow its convicted felons to vote. >> i'm so sorry, he can vote for himself. >> he's got to vote for himself. certain states are different. >> he's a beloved figure. >> self-love. >> so doloves himself. >> so does putin. >> and coming up, new
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information on the missing plane. what it could all mean. more "morning joe" straight ahead. transferred money from his before larry instantly bank of america savings account to his merrill edge retirement account. before he opened his first hot chocolate stand calling winter an "underserved season". and before he quit his friend's leaf-raking business for "not offering a 401k." larry knew the importance of preparing for retirement. that's why when the time came he counted on merrill edge
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we want to get more on that breaking news this morning from malaysia. official there is say some of the data was tledeleted on the e
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flight simulator. the question is when it was deleted, why it was deleted, if it was deleted right before the flight as if it was something premeditated. greg feith with the national transportation safety board, is this information notable to you on a scale of one to ten? can you hone in on this and tell us how important it is. >> i think right now it's a 7 to 8 only because these fly simulators, especially as elaborate as the captain's flight simulator, can enable him to go out and log flights. they'll fly around, record that information into a file so that you can play it back and typically they use it for training. it's interesting because if this person, this captain was using his simulator to do dry runs and these files were logged and it went into that file that's been deleted, then that's really going to be key. this is where the focus of the
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investigation is right now, in the background with both pilots. >> i know you haven't seen the simulator itself, but the images you've seen, how sophisticated is the simulator in his home? >> it's very sophisticated. i have a flight simulator at home. i wish i had this setup. he has three screens, a nice display this emulates the 777. it's a very elaborate setup and i'm sure he's got some money put into the system. the fact now we have deleted files -- >> what type of money would you have have to put into a system like this. is that normal for a pilot to have? >> i would buy one like that but you have to be an aficionado and put some money into it. that would be several thousand dollars. >> is that something that pilots do in their spare time? >> i don't think all pilots
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would want too go in there and fly a simulator after they've just flown for eight hours. >> that's what i'm wondering. >> it's apparent this pilot was just immersed in flying in some way, shape or form. >> greg, if in a simulator that sophisticated, what are the chances we can delete the computer files? >> i'm not an expert but the forensic guys who do the work will probably get some of those deleted files, in not all of them. >> authorities are still looking into when they were deleted. they are making no connections right now. >> okay. clearly if he has deleted files, he might have just been cleaning out his in box so to speak. >> when you hear that and it's a very good point, is this red he?
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>> it could be. it depends on what's in the file folder. >> we have an entire team working on this. obviously there have been issues with transparency with information coming out malaysia. greg, stand by. thanks very much. up next, the must-read opinion p pages. plus, president obama awards veterans who were long overlooked for their heroic actions. ♪ [ girl ] my mom, she makes underwater fans
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president obama has recognized the sacrifice of 24 veterans, the largest group of medal of honor recipients since world war ii. just three of the honorees are still alive, all having served during the vietnam war. >> reporter: for 72-year-old vietnam veteran melvin morris, it was 44 years in coming. when president obama called with the news, morris collapsed to his knees. >> i was overwhelmed at that point. he was saving "be cool, be cool, be cool." >> reporter: at a highly emotional white house ceremony, president obama presented a medal of honor to 24 service members from world war ii, korea and vietnam, all passed oaf
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because they were hispanic, jewish or african-american. >> as one family member had said, in is long overdue. >> only three are living today. for more than an hour, the citations were read. the president presented the nation's highest military honor to the family of those who dedicated their lives to their country. as one of the original army green berets, the battle was almost his last. >> i went in and threw hand grenades everywhere. >> reporter: under relentle lel enemy fire, he was shot three times. that same year, santiago was pinned down by enemy fire, the
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soldier next to him shot dead. morris doesn't believe he was the victim of discrimination, on or off the battlefield. >> it doesn't matter, we all bled the same bled. >> reporter: the thing he cherishes most, his green beret. i'll never wash it. i always said let the blood, sweat and tears stay in it. >> very touching. when you think of the fact that these were real heros that fought for this country and were denied because they were hispanic or black or jewish, it was a heart wrenching this evening to watch the president do this. >> it was so hard to see their families, the younger members of the families of those who passed away, those who will never see the recognition they deserved. >> and died never knowing -- >> died never knowing.
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>> this is the kind of thing we have to think of as we send people into the battlefield and think of the people serving now. >> and these are people that believed in parts of the country, even when parts of the country didn't believe in them. >> it is overdue. >> way overdue. >> and we have another simmering crisis and that's ukraine. this ties in well with a piece we have coming up on putin's personality as a leader and his potential impact on the world. but she says this: "although the recent rollout of sanctions on members of putin's inner circle viewed at weak were followed by a russian market rally, stronger sanctions could be more damaging. then again it may be that putin doesn't really care. his interest isn't in today's
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markets but for tomorrow's empire. as far as putin is concerned, he's in charge. he's the lead who are keeps his word. putin said he'd take crimea, and he did. if he doesn't go further into ukraine, it won't be to save face but to allow others to relax and for his ben fishents, crimea be forgiven. this is his calculation. we look at his personality, mike barnicle, and i don't feel like this is someone who you can fairly negotiate with. i understand we have to do sanctions, we don't want to jump into something but i don't see someone on the other end who wants to do the right thing. >> but there is someone on the
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other end and that's part of the delicate dance that the president of the united states is involved with. is andrea still there is it. >> -- is andrea still there? >> no, she's off working. >> well, sam stein is still there. we are dealing with a world leader who is a prisoner of his own past, trying to recreate some semblance of a soviet empire of the past. >> a lot of people in our industry are trying to get into the mindset of vladimir putin as if we can sort of unlock what he's doing.
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we know he does have ambitions to at least push the boundaries, i would say and he seems willing to at least cause his country a bit of short-term economic harm for long-term ambition. where that leads us is anyone's guess. it could be crimea is the end of his ambitions, it could be that he wants to go further into ukraine. you can guess out or game out a bunch of different options but until he makes a play, we're kind of at a loss. >> vladimir putin is here to stay, reelected in 2012. so whoever takes the white house over has a putin problem. >> the russian president wants to punish america with sanctions on u.s. senators?
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we'll discuss at that as "morning joe" continues. a backyard invasion. homeowner takes matters into his own hands. ♪ ortho weed b gon max. with the one-touch, continuous spray wand... kills weeds without harming innocent lawns. guaranteed. weeds killed. lawn restored. justice served. weed b gon max with the one-touch wand. get order. get ortho®. so whoever takes the white house
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coming up at the top of the hours, we're going to talk to nbc's chuck todd. we'll talk to the "new york times" reporter who broke the story about the plane's computer being programmed to take the flight far off course. keep it right here on "morning joe." ♪
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all right, welcome back to "morning joe." looks like the sun is coming up over washington. joining us, host of "the daily rundown" chuck todd. and reporter michael schmidt, he had breaking details late last night on the missing plane. and joining us, retired nbc news
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aviation correspondent, chuck hager with information on the flight simulator in the home of the pilot. it sure looks like whoever changed the flight plan on the missing jet. what's still iunclear is who di it and why and where the flight is today. but here's what we do know now. saturday, march 8, malaysia flight 370 departs from kuala lumpur airport. they are set to arrive in beijing six hours later. 1:07 a.m., about a half hour after the departure, the plane sends its last electronic transmission to air traffic control via the acars system. 1:19 a.m., 12 minutes later, one of the pilots say "all right,
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good night" to ground control. those were the last words spoken by anyone on board flight 370. 1:21 a.m., the plane's transponders go dead. there's no indication anything is wrong with the plane before dropping off radar. the pilots were supposed to check in with vietnamese air control. they never did. the flight veered sharply to the left, the u-turn that now appears to be premeditated. turning off the transponder and acars system, easy, taking no more than 20 seconds. >> all have i to do is spin this knob for the heading around and the aircraft will turn around. >> searches of the captain's and first officer's homes have turned up nothing suspicious,
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but according to one retired 777 captain, one thing does remain clear. >> this would be a very elaborate scheme. they would have had very, very extensive training to pull this off. >> okay. extensive training. also deleted files in the pilot's home. bob hager, what do you make of all of this and how do you rate the latest information from a one to ten? greg feith gave it about a 7 or 8. >> i don't know that i'd rate it that high. i'd give it a 3 or 4. it's useful to know the pilot preprogrammed -- somebody in the cockpit preprogrammed the left turn. the malaysians probably know when. did they do it before they took off, in-flight? you'd like to know hope more if
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you could only find the recordings and the black boxes. that's getting slimmer and slimmer that you would. the two other suicides that we know of, both of those became evident it was probably a suicide after they had found the wreckage and pulled up the flight data recorders. that's what showed it to have happened. >> michael schmidt, let's talk to you about the story that you broke about the preplanned system change within auto pilot. explain to us how you are able to get this information because it seems as though your reporting is pushing the malaysian authorities to confirm on the back end of what they're putting out there. it seems like you're a step ahead of what authorities are willing to tell us on the face of it. >> i think the problem last week was that the malaysians didn't say anything and this were very quiet. because of that people started to wonder why aren't they talking?
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and then they came out on saturday and they said, yes, we think foul play was involved. and then since then they've gone back and sort of corrected some facts about different things and because they didn't say anything for that first week, people are very skeptical of what they're saving now and saying, well, why are you going back and talking now when you haven't said anything for the first week? apparently the u.s. had to prod them into this by saying look, it's not helping you or helping anyone else by not talking. i think that's why we've seen more information the past few days. >> let's go back to the turn the plane makes after its initial take-off. continuing reports that it was a sharp left turn. but is it a sharp left turn? when you change direction, isn't it a big gradual bend? >> it's a 20-degree turn so it's not really sharp. that also was one of the clues besides the information on the acars, because it was such a
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nice, smooth turn, it sure has the appearance of a computer-entered kind of turn. the flight management system is flying the plane automatically at that point. that's a reason for the smooth turn. >> michael, i'm just wondering in terms of the information that you broke late last night, are they going to be able to retrieve the information? what are you hearing about what's forthcoming next? also talk to me a little bit about the lack of transparency or the willingness to malaysia to give up information to help us find out what happened here. >> i think the moegs interesting thing to come out this morning is the deleted files on the computer. because there's so much attention given to this story, that becomes sort of the development in a sense but we all have deleted files on our computer so what does this really mean? does this allow american investigators to come more into the investigation? they've been on the outside
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looking in. and say, hey, we have expertise in this, we can help you find the deleted files. i don't think the united states wants to be running this investigation, but i think they want to be more involved than they are now. the fbi has a few agents on the ground in malaysia that are taking in the information that comes in but aren't really playing a larger role than that. >> michael, we were talking about how elaborate that simulator was in his home. do we have any idea how long he had this? when did he buy this? was this a recent purchase? was he adding to it? what is the time frame here he was building this up at home, the pilot? >> all we know is that it was fairly elaborate and that he had different trips that he had come up with for the simulator that he had gone through. besides that we don't know a lot. and i guess the problems in terms of information is because the malaysians haven't said a lot, the only way we're really
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learning a lot is by talking to officials here in washington in sort of a game of telephone to try and figure out what's going on. i think that comes back to the issue i was saying before is that there's not a lot of confidence in what the malaysians are saying or their investigation because they're not saving much. >> barnicle. >> is your instinct similar to a lot of the instinct of a lot of people covering the story in that we might never know the why? >> i do increasingly feel that way. all my career i avoided saying that in crashes because so often two year after you'd find such a key piece of evidence, but in this case i think it's possible we may never know. or if we do have theories and all, it would just being circumstantial evidence, which is not very satisfying. >> bob hager, that he can you so much.
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michael schmidt as well. >> for someone staying low key about a potential presidential ambition, former governor jeb bush has a packed political schedule. he'll be crisscrossing the country on behalf of a long list of politicians with political causes. and then it's off to a conference of education, one of his krey issues. he's going to touch down to raise money for susan martinez. mr. bush is also set to speak to members of the republican jewish coalition, that event is taking place at a casino owned by
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sheldon adeleson. the former governor has said he will decide about a possible run for the white house by the end of the year. chuck todd, there's a lot of reasons why people don't announce, because once you announce, the sharks start to swarm. but what does this tell you? anything? >> it just fits everything i've been hearing about jeb and what he's up to, that he has brought back some of his political team, that he is in the stage of saying, you know, i want to create as much room for myself as possible to possibly run. that this is serious this time, this isn't like four years ago where he wasn't doing the little things to prepare for a run. this is doing the little things to prepare for a run. i do think people assume -- too many people write him off and assume he's not going to do it,
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he's not going to do it. i think he's in a place where he's more likely to do it than not, knowing this is his last shot and he clearly has ambition to do this. when you're staring into the abyss this is your last shot to do it. >> so knowing this is his last shot to doing this and the playing field. put your mind where jeb bush might be and looking at who is out there, how could you not consider it? >> plus we need to have another bush. we talk about jeb about every month as a potential candidate. i think chuck said it in the past, that if he were to run, i would think the main trouble he would face would come from within the republican party.
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i think this is why we see him doing these types of events with different governors, traveling around the country, that he needs to earn some respect back from republicans, he needs to earn some respect within the establishment. >> well, he's very well respected in terms of his mind and his leadership in the state of florida, what he's been able to do there and how he responds to natural disasters. i'm obviously not on his side of the aisle but anybody who accused this show of being a bunch of people sitting around the table clubbing baby seals, he good in my book, which is what he did on live television here. >> he was a very effective governor of the state of florida, he was a very accomplished person. he'll be a terrific candidate if he chooses to run. i just wonder of the weight --
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it's like watching a series, it's a bush and a clinton and a bush and a clinton. >> i think his biggest negative would be the bush name. the positive is you see some of the moderates in the republicans trying to beat back the extreme right in the tea party. he emerges as an adult. we don't know what's happened with chris christie so he may not have much competition there and he has an angle no one else has, appeal to latino voters given his family. there's a lot of elements there that may make him run. if i was him, i wouldn't announce early because i wouldn't want to be todded, as in chuck todded. >> off of what reverend al just said, though, the governor does have an appeal to la tinos and to immigrants, people who have come to this country, legally or illegally. whatever. is this not part of the weight
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he covers in a primary, the activist? >> i think if he doesn't run, it will be because he concluded he didn't want to have to sit here and get beaten up and defend his brother's record in a primary. his last name i think it ends up being the whole baggage of the bush family ends up being a bigger problem in the primary than in the general because of the hillary clinton aspect of things. when you look at him as a candidate and you're the republican party, he's from the most important swing state, if you're a republican that's days. and if he could get 35% of the spanish vote, you'd have a
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nominee that. >> the hard decision for him is going to be whether he's ready to go through the gauntlet of the republican party. >> well, for the woman who has everything, at least we know what to get her for christmas, hillary clinton needs rosetta stone spanish. >> all right, the politics for equal pay for women continues to be an issue in texas. trying to fix things here so she said this, this is really helpful. "men are better negotiators. i would encourage women instead of pursuing the courts for action to become better negotiators." >> did she make that statement in this century? >> she made the statement after
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an awkward interview by the head of red state women, another woman, a republican super pac aimed at recruiting female voters. and in that interview, carrie christman, who i invite on this show, i will help you, carrie, attempts to explain the lillian ledbedder policy on women. >> we have a lot to juggle. when we look at this issue, what's practical. we want to go get a higher education degree at the same time we're working or raising a
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family. that's common sense. we believe that real world solution is a more practical way to approach the problem. >> maybe you know this, too. was that part of a hostage tape? >> no. >> she actually got paid 7 7 cents for that message. >> stop. it's terrible. >> the guy filming got $1. >> it's really hard to hear. >> it's painful. when you're looking at how they're avoiding the issue, the issue is 77 cents to $1 women to men in the country. it's raise crazy. >> i applaud the women, especially when it pertains to the lilly ledbetter act, if republicans have better ideas, bring them to the table. i mean, there's not just one solution. and the campaign for wendy davis
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now after this has been circulating that pathetic interview. she is making it an issue in her run for election. i applaud her for that. who wouldn't. other republicans are also weighing in on the equal pay debate, minnesota state representative andrea kiefer says, quote, we are losing the respect we so dearly want in the workplace by bringing up these special bills for women and almost making us look like whiners." >> now you can see, mika, why there's such a ground swell for joe to run for president. i told joe if he runs, i'll go in all the hard republican districts and endorse his
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opponents. >> joe was my champion. as it pertains to women's issues, he's on the right side of this. i don't understand why republicans can't still be republicans and be on the right side of paying women equal to men and making steps to see that's happening. what's frustrating is these are women who can't articulate the issue. i think you don't have to love everything the president has done on this issue. >> this isn't about special laws either. >> it's about respect and -- >> why don't we use the word biotch at i-- while we're at it. >> and no offense to you, mr. white male, you were just born this way. i understand you were born this way. i'm just saying there are women
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out there that look from a respect of marginalized issues -- >> me? >> no, i was saying they have this perspective. >> i don't know if he's proclaiming that or feeling sorry for you, mike. >> this is pretty simple. it's about equity. chuck todd knows. do you have a daughter? do you want your daughter going into a workplace where, geez, you're very well qualified. we're going to give you the job we were going to give him but we're not going to give you the same pay. >> let me defend the woman from whiner to we're too busy. first of all, we are incredibly busy. that's why this needs to be fixed by laws and courts and everybody else because we're busy, working, raising our children and taking care of everybody. secondly, women are not very good negotiators.
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we should be more of us at the table so these problems exist less and we should work on our communication skills because we should know our value and we should bring our value to the table. as well as we evaluate the value of our company or our co-worker, we should do so for ourselves. and thirdly, as far as being whiners, the word bitch, the word angry, all these things being aimmediatepplied to women you're an aggressive woman and you go after what you want in the workplace, your boss wants you working for him. don't be afraid of women who take those words and put them in the wrong category. >> i can help you, carrie. >> jerry: i want to respectfully disagree with you. we are spoiled, we are affluent.
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we've taken the word "busy" and misappropriated it. you want busy? take a look at our parents and grandparents. >> how about the single mother who works the overnight shift and her husband is no where to be found. that's busy. >> sam stein is making it a little uncomfortable to me. i just want to talking about in a what the lilly led better attack does is and we said let broaden that window. that is essentially a tool for
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women to become better narrators. >> so here's the deal. i could take what carrie said in that painful, most terrible sound bite i've ever heard in my life. if you want to fight the lilly ledbetter act, here's what you say. we don't need more prosecution and more time for women to fight their battles in court. we need women to be better negotiators, we need to be sure they're at the table and they develop the same skills at men. that's not going to happen if they're not at the table. we need to pay them equally to men, not knowing they're going to get jobs they're paid less to do. in fact, we can do anything that men do, perhaps even better with less risk involved, ie. the
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financial and so you can fight the lilly ledbetter act if you want to. i personally think it's a great start. but you don't say it with the word "cycle" three times. >> and i'm sorry for getting on my tirade. i apologize. i feel so strongly about this. >> but there's a real -- there's a simple thing that i sometimes -- a simple number you want to hand the republicans right now. it's 53. that's the percentage of the electorate that's female, okay? a majority of voters in this country are women, not men. i for the life of me, why the republican party continues to
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put itself in a box, you know, you just -- it's simple math here. they become the party that is not very helpful to women and they're going to be a permanent minority, at least in presidential elections. >> i have to say something because women also do have to help themselves and i just broke one of the cardinal rules of my book, know your value. i said i'm sorry. i'm actually not. >> hey, barnicle, i have edward ed winwin on. >> do you provide day care? he has a 3-year-old. >> i think some of the staffers might say every day we provide day care. >> up next, president putin,
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what is driving the man who germany's chancellor says is living in another world. and dick durbin says he'll welcome being put on putin's so-called enemy list. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. ♪ ♪
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russian president vladimir putin allowing crimea to return to russia, it's not the first time he's faced strong criticism. here's a look at why putin is often at odds in the united states. >> i look into putin's eyes and see three letters, a k, a -- k, g, b. >> vladimir putin worked his way through the spy agency's ranks, eventually retiring at a colonel in 1991. he then turned to a life in
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politics. it wasn't until 1999 when boris yeltsin made him prime minister that the world would find out who putin really is. putin has positioned himself against the united states at nearly every turn. after the tragedy of 9/11, he opposed the war on terror, and more recently granted asylum to the nsa whistle blower. the carnage in syria continues without any end in sight, up to 150,000 dead, all thanks in parts of putin's support of bashar al assad. and last year he wrote a scathing op-ed saying military invention is now common place for the united states and took a shot at the american people writing "it's extremely dangerous to encourage people to see themselves as exceptional,
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whatever the motivation." >> putin, big, strong, muscular on a horse. >> that's an image that looks like it should be airbrushed on to the side of a van in a new jersey rest area. >> putin is also a master of manipulation, carefully shaping his image as a strong, fearless leader of mother russia. he's a black belt in judo and isn't shy about showing off his skills. his machismo was on full display in 2008 when he saved a television crew from a siberian tiger. he later admitted the rescue was staged and he made a remarkable recovery of two your honors at the base of the black sea. but again, later fessed up that
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it was staged. and he's literally rewriting history, changing textbooks in russia to ensure he's remembered in a positive light. so now as putin reclaims crimea for russia, the united states is faced with one question -- how do you respond to a tyrant that some world leaders consider to be in another world. >> i imagine a lot of disagreement among the top leaders and putin may be showing himself to be more clumsy. at the same time you can say to the russians it's neither in your interest or in our interest to reignite the cold war. >> mika, super putin? >> our next guest, senate majority whip dick durbin.
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one of the things you reacted to is you will most likely be put on this list of americans that will be sanctioned by vladimir putin, and you're fine with that? >> i'm just fine with that. my mother was born in lithuania and the baltics were held captive for decades by the soviets. when putin tries to show this growth in empire by invading the republic or georgia or ukraine, you bet we're going to speak out. if that makes him angry, so be it. >> i know you just recently got back from a bipartisan delegation from ukraine. what are your observations that you bring back and is the u.s. doing enough right now, just financial sanctions, we've only made a military commitment to give rations to the ukrainian military, are we doing enough or
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is the criticism valid that we're not? >> let's rule out completely american boots on the ground. that's not going to happen. in terms of standing behind ukraine and making sure that the western nations in europe and other places are imposing sanctions on putin, i say we have to definitely do that to make it clear to him there's a price we pay, whether we're talking about economic sanctions, such as affecting trade and such between the countries, i think we need to put the pressure on. otherwise there are more countries that are going to be vulnerable. you look at the baltic nations, you look at the future of moldova. >> one of the levers putin has is russia's vast energy supplies, vast natural gas supplies. what you hear politicians in
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washington, d.c. say is why doesn't the u.s. fill that void, why don't they provide more supplies to eastern europe so much we can enforce sanctions? >> in a short period of time the united states has come into energy surplus. the discovery of more natural gas resources, for example. that has helped us. it's lowered the cost of manufacturing in the united states. it has attracted back industries and jobs to our country. so it's been a boone to the american economy and recovery. now can we take this surplus and share it with other countries through trade, helping them with energy dependence from russia? you're right to say putin is going to play natural gas and oil as his trump cards against
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these countries. >> senator, speaking of trum many cards wh -- trump cards, france and great britain have greater proximity to russia than we do. what are the possibilities to a coordinated response, the united states and specifically germany on the next step up the ladder? >> it's a valid point because the gas exports from russia to the european union are a major part of their energy picture. and if if they are going to -- this negotiation is going to result in a reduction in those exports, it will be at the expense of european local economies. that's why i think angela merkel and others have been negotiating directly with putin, but he's ignored them completely. i think we're at the point where he's clearly going to take over
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crimea and may be poised to move into eastern ukraine, if we don't take a good, hard, tough stand against him now, he's going to continue. >> i want to talk about your home state of illinois and what's going on with the governor's race, that the governor there, quinn, is the most vulnerable governor for reelection. how are you going to double down to make sure he stays in office? >> an interesting primary last night in illinois. in the two top race for the senate, my seat as well as for the governorship, there were much closer republican primary contests than anticipated. the republican nominee spent millions of his own dollar and barely squaeeaked out a victory. at the end of the day, they don't want people to buy offices in our state. so, yes, pat quinn is challenged
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but i think he has a strong message and it's going to be a close contest and i think he'll prevail. >> senator dick durbin, it's all good to you have on the show. and congratulations for being on the sanctions list. >> coming up, new information on fly 370s path. he has new details on the flight simulator that's now at the focus of the investigation. we'll talk to him live next on "morning joe." ♪
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let's get an update now with some breaking news from malaysia. officials there say some of the data was deleted on the home flight simulator of the pilot who was in the cockpit of the missing jetliner. tom costello joins us with more on that. >> good morning. day 12, still no sign of the plane but there is this new twist about the flight simulator. authorities say some of the data on february 3rd was deleted. it's not clear whether that was routine data or something else. some of the information was deleted off the flight simulator
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in the home of airport shah. >> some data has been deleted from the simulator and forensic work to retrieve this data is ongoing. >> reporter: meanwhile, no clear answers on who programmed into malaysia's 370 flight simulator the u-turn that took them off course. >> if i want to leave this route, it's as simple as pressing a button and now turning. you'll see the airplane is leaving its route. >> reporter: we asked pilot steve wallacestein to shows house to reprogram the plane. >> all i have to do is set a different altitude here and the plane will go to a different altitude. >> reporter: this morning some inside. the plane's u-turn appeared to
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have been a smooth, 20-degree turn. they do not believe that the plane then climbed to 45,000 feet. and it still possible that passengers slept through all of this, never knowing something was wrong. meanwhile as the search focusses on the indian ocean, an alternate theory is suggesting an electrical fire could have taken out the plane's comes and taken out the crew. the auto pilot would have then flown the plane into the ocean. >> an electrical fire, u couldn't disable all the systems very rapidly with an electrical based fire. >> so reports that someone has spotted the plane maybe sitting in a jungle or in pieces on the
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ocean. so far none of those leads have checked out. importantly everyone on board is being careful. >> all right, tom costello, thank you very much. up next, what's really next on economic sanctions on russia? plus, the financial health of obamacare, which had new numbers in yesterday. keep it right here on "morning joe." ♪ ♪ ♪ [ girl ] my mom, she makes underwater fans that are powered by the moon. ♪ she can print amazing things, right from her computer.
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♪ ♪ here with us now, former director of the office of
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management and budget and citigroup executive now, peter orszag. how are you doing? >> great. >> you look relaxed. >> everything's relative. >> you were talking to barnicle about the difference between serving and not serving in the white house. you do look -- you have more color in your face. anyhow, let's talk about the sanctions on russia so far. what have we imposed and why does it not appear to be working? are we being like the typical impatient american and we're supposed to give it time? why doesn't n't we see some kin reaction? we see vladimir putin making grand pronouncements about his new acquisition, which is crimea. >> unless we're going to prohibit investment in russia -- >> what have we done? >> we've done limited things involving russian officials and associates. the kicker would come and i
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don't think we'll be doing this because we'd be shooting ourselves in the foot as much as harming them is restrict investment into russia. >> everyone goes as far to say we've done something personally on putin and his advisers. what? are we feeling it now? >> there are fears of restrictions in freezing assets. ironically that could create an incentive for oligarchs to take money back into russia.
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i care about that. we don't have incursions into eastern ukraine. the problem is right now we're almost fighting the last battle. we have to say that was wrong, fine. do not do this or there will be very severe consequences. you don't say that unless you mean it. >> obamacare hit a 5 million benchmark yesterday where they have 5 million enrolled since october 1st. how would you rate that in terms
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of the ultimate goal, i think, i believe, of 6 million two months from now? and is enough being done to message how this helps or, does it just not help businesses? >> well, first, that's really good news, and that reflects the fact that the embrollio over the website is addressed and we're catching up. at the same time, the news on cost trends, so in medicare, unbelievably good. i mean, the first five months of the fiscal year, the increase in medicare relative to the first year, 0.0, despite the baby boomers retiring. health care is an exciting sector now, because there is a ton going on and a ton should be going on, not only on coverage but on changing the way hospitals and doctors are paid. >> that's the cost curve you're talking about? >> that's the cost curve. there is much better news on the cost curve over the past four, five years than people appreciate, and that's a huge deal. as we know, basically everything you think you think you know about our fiscal future, if this
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slowdown in health care costs were to continue, that would be wrong. our fiscal future would be much, much better. >> real quickly. you saying we shouldn't -- we shouldn't say something if we don't mean it, a lot of people criticized the president over the red line mark over syria and the fact that vladimir putin walked into handhold bashar al assad over the syrian, they crossed the red line. we didn't do anything. when it comes to crimea and watching putin change the borders of ukraine and russia, and we don't do anything, how is this not emboldening that man to continue that, and as you talk about, moldova and others, how does that not embolden him in. >> i think crimea would have occurred regardless. and the key point, again, as we both agree, you got to be credible. so draw the boundary where you really believe it to be. i would draw it around eastern ukraine. and stick to it. >> peter orszag, great to see you. thank you so much. >> good to be with you.
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>> have you on board here. on monday's show, former president jimmy carter joins us. still ahead from business leaders to cabinet secretaries, "elle" magazine looks at the d.c. power list. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. this body made two amazing little human beings i love this body and what it's capable of. no matter what size. but, this version feels really good. my body, like my life, is a work in progress. but i'm getting there with weight watchers. the new simple start plan made it so easy for me to start losing weight right away. and before i knew it, i was back on track to being the me that i want to be. join for free. try meetings, do it online or both. hurry, offer ends march 22nd weight watchers because it works you really love, what would you do?" ♪ [ woman ] i'd be a writer.
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up next, new developments overnight as the investigators turn their investigation to the pilot of flight 370. what will deleted data from his flight same later reveal?
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(whistling) good morning. it's 8:00 on the east coast. 5:00 a.m. on the west coast as you take a live look at new york city. back with us on set, we have
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mike barnicle, thomas roberts, dressed differently today, and reverend al sharpton, dressed o so -- so well today. i mean, you must have those made. you have them made. >> i take what thomas roberts won't take. >> oh! it's the leftover. >> yes. >> and from washington, the always elegant andrea mitchell and sam stein. >> thank you. >> let's go with our top story. we now know whoever changed the flight plan on board the missing jet in asia had specific knowledge about the plane's computers and tracking equipment. what we don't know is where and why, and where the flight is today. still, we don't know. sources tell nbc news the plane's altered course was programmed at least 12 minutes before the co-pilot signed off with those words, "all right, good night." still, the u-turn could reflect the pilot's alternate route in case of an emergency, and doesn't necessarily mean something more sinister was at
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play. with a search grid of 2 million square nautical miles, malaysia is relying on other countries. a huge portion of the yar is in the southern indian ocean, southwest of australia where american aircraft are combing through rough waters for any sign of debris. the area is just too big for underwater sonar. much of the focus remains on the pilot and first officers. first officer, i may. the officials say nothing suspicious turned up in homes of either men. so we begin there. and then we try to branch out, just like investigators are. joining us now, former senior air safety investigator with the national transportation and safety board, greg feith. greg, i guess the biggest development is knowing this was planned in the 12 minutes before the u-turn. what does that tell us, and what does it not tell us? >> well, i think you characterize it right, mika. the problem is that pilots will typically put an alternate
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flight plan into the flight management system, and the fact that this airplane made a turn after the last communication and there was a change in direction, we're not really sure if that was one of those things that was programmed in as an emergency, or some alternate flight plan to take the airplane possibly to the south indian ocean. >> okay. so it's still, though, a massive span to look for. do you have any -- and i know it's very difficult for someone who does what you do -- to have a theory? because you're supposed to leave your mind open. but when you heard the news last night and this latest development, where did your mind go? >> again, you know, i try to keep an open mind. >> i know, i know. >> and one of the things is that if this is premeditated, it's obvious that this person, whoever was in control of the aircraft, didn't want to be seen, didn't want to be tracked, and was taking this airplane to
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a point -- puzzle. we get some very scant information from the malaysians. it's difficult to piece together what is fact and factoid and put it into a logical story line, and it's very difficult as an accident investigator to really do that right now with what we have. >> for people that are looking at this scratching their head, confounded at the latest details on how they switch or how they adapt, is that surprising to you? or is this just showing that the malaysian officials who are in charge of this investigation are not the sharpest ones to be at the top of this? >> they thought that they could handle an investigation like this. they had the eyes of the world on them. they were going to show the world that, hey, we can play with the biggest of accident investigation groups like the united states. and they found very quickly that this is a very daunting, overwhelming task. unfortunately, all of the assets that are bringing in now from
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all these various countries should have been brought in in the first place. because that was the highest probability of finding anything. now, as the days pass, i'm not very confident that they're going to find what we're looking for. >> greg, the reality is that at this point, this is a search story, i would think. and let's give people some indication of the scope of the search. we tried to do it yesterday. let's reinforce that today. is it not accurate to say that the search operation being conducted for this plane basically similar to planes and ships trying to find a single plane parked underwater somewhere in the territory the size of the united states? >> that's a very good characterization. you know, i can put that airplane anywhere in the united states and then say go find it. it is a daunting task. and when you're talking about 28 million square miles of water that they're now looking at,
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especially with the ocean. because the ocean's a little different. i mean, it is so vast. it is changing all the time. so you could search and area and find that there was nothing there, only to have wreckage float in there the next day. we just don't know, because the sea state is constantly changing. so that, too, presents a real challenge for the searchers only because if they thought an area was clear, a sea state could actually bring parts back into an area they've already searched and we may miss it. >> let me just ask this real quickly. the fact that a lot of focus is on the pilots, you had said to me that it could have been one pilot if either of them were involved that had programmed the computer while the other one was circling around the plane getting ready -- during his regular security check, it would not necessarily mean both. and in some cases, the other one wouldn't have known, would want it done before they took their seat in the cockpit?
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>> that's correct, reverend. the big thing here is that one of the pilots could have programmed both flight plans, and then when the other pilot returned to the cockpit and asked, is it ready to go? yes, we've got the flight plans programmed in. they'll put it up on the primary flight displays, see that the flight plan's been programmed in, we're good to go. >> all right. we're looking at different angles throughout this hour the show today. and just i'll end this part of this new segment, because we have other big news to get to with new information from malaysian officials. according to malaysian officials, the pilot that they were looking at, who they found a flight simulator at his home, what they're finding now is he had information deleted off of his simulator. they're trying to figure out what that was, if it was anything. but there is something that was deleted off that simulator. we're going to get back with you, greg. we'll have you check into that, and we've got some reports coming up, as well. >> real quickly, i want to add, they said they're trying to retrieve the files.
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>> i know. can you do that? >> that have been deleted. they're saying they're giving it their best effort. obviously, though, adding to this, this is the defense minister who revealed this information, saying that the pilots in this captain shot is innocent until proven guilty of any wrongdoing. >> okay. >> but still, they're trying to get the files, obviously they become of great importance seeing they've been recently deleted. >> malaysian officials coughing up information. that's been another part of this story. there's been a call for more transparency on their part of the investigation. maybe we're getting it now. maybe not. again, deleted files on the pilot's flight simulator, the one at his home. they're trying to retrieve those files. we'll look into that more. greg feith, if you need to come back, we'll bring you back. we have to get to ukraine. russian president vladimir putin wasted no time in taking a victory lap following crimea's annexation to russia. speaking in red square in moscow, putin made an emotional address to thousands of cheering russians, calling crimea a,
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quote, integral part of russia. if the sanctions put forth by president obama the day before made any impact, you couldn't see it. it didn't show in the attitude of the russian leader. meanwhile, in a show of solidarity with allies of the region, vice president joe biden made a whirlwind tour through eastern europe, visiting leaders of astonia, latvia and poland. the vice president called putin's move in crimea a land grab, and when the president of poland mentioned russia's recent increase in military budget, biden offered this assurance. >> well, others may not have stood to their responsibilities, the united states has more than stood up to its responsibilit s responsibilities. we have a budget larger than the next ten nations in the world combined. so don't worry about where we are. >> our andrea mitchell, i want to ask you about biden's promises, about putin's, standing before everybody and
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calling this a great success and completely flying in the face of everything he's saying of any sanctions that might have come forward yesterday. i guess we're going to need to see more sanctions? or do sanctions need more time to be felt? what's your assessment of that, and then we'll get to this disturbing video. >> well, first of all, i think the u.s. sanctions so far were the least sanctions that the president could have done. now, he has authorized tougher sanctions, and now that president putin has made it very clear that this is a fait accompli they have to step it up. most people believe that, and they have to see what angela merkel and europe is prepared to do this week. they not only rejected the sanctions, but they derided them. there were tweets from russian officials, the deputy prime minister talking about comrade barack obama and ridiculing the u.s.'s efforts. putin was emotional. he was strident. in two speeches. first speaking in st. george's hall in the kremlin, then going
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out to red square. he absolutely declared that crimea had always been part of russia, needed to be a part of russia, was returning to russia. he said the west, u.s., nato had cheated repeatedly over and over again. he just completely derided the united states and nato and the west, complaining particularly about the fact that nato was on his borders, saying they had lied and cheated. and it was the most sort of over the top cold war sounding speech that many people had heard. >> wow. >> i spoke to michael mcfall afterwards, and he said that this was really very surprising and didn't indicate any willingness at all to back down. you know, biden is completing his lithuania. he hat promised stepped-up nato exercises. that's what we're told, show the strength of nato. there is money there in that budget. >> in crimea, obviously new signs of tension. gunmen dressed in russian
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military uniforms stormed a navy base killing one ukrainian soldier, the first known casualty of the conflict. in response to the incident, ukraine's defense minister authorized soldiers to use live ammunition in self-defense in crimea. sam stein, obviously, this is just the beginning. >> yeah. clearly it's just the beginning. one of the things that's been interesting to see is that no one, at least in the united states, has called for any u.s. military personnel to be sent over to the region to draw a line -- >> right. >> a line. but there have been critics of the president's policy who have called for more military assistance to be sent to the ukraine. i'm wondering, andrea, if you know or heard why it would ta take -- how long it would take to get that military assistance to ukraine. and what form it would come in. and what good it would do? >> well, what they're talking about, with john mccain principally talking about, is defensive weapons, antiaircraft weapons. it would take a while to get
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there. what's so striking is the u.s. congress has not even agreed on sanctions and on the economic aid. and they left for recess, with senate and house disagreement. the house passed one bill, but there were provisions in it on the imf that senators -- democratic-led senators won't agree with. so even on that minor piece, the senate and the house can't agree. so it doesn't show great strength and great resolve by the united states, at least the legislative branch. >> also. elsewhere, we have according to very disturbing video posted online, i actually watched the entire part of this, it's frightening. it's about six minutes long. far-right members of a ukrainian nationalist party can be seen storming a state-run tv station, assaulting and terrorizing the ceo, forcing him to resign. the men accused the ceo of using the station to campaign for moscow. nbc has not confirmed the authenticity of the video.
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but you really do get a sense of the complexity of this when you read about exactly what they were trying to do, barnicle, what happened with the sanctions yesterday, but also this, quote, vote to annex/secede/separate crimea from ukraine. >> it's incredibly complex and delicate situation for the united states as well as the ukraine. andrea, one of the things that came to mind just watching that video is clearly the white house and the secretary of state are involved in climbing the ladder on sanctions. there will be further sanctions, tougher sanctions down the road. what do you hear about the problem within the problem? crimea is basically gone. that's not coming back. but the problem within the problem is how do we keep ukraine out of starting a hot war, a shooting war? >> well, these last two incidents, first of all, what happened yesterday in crimea, in the capital of crimea, with the
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first known casualty, death, and another person was injured, as well. and now we're hearing reports that other ukrainian soldiers are being forced out of their base, that basically the russian takeover of crimea is being completed. and i don't know how you stop the tension. so far, the ukrainian acting leaders have been very restrained. but they have to defend themselves at some point. >> we've got to get to other news. we have great politics to get to, as well. i have a follow-up to a story that we reported on yesterday. it's the politics of equal pay. we know that -- i feel very strongly about that here. >> texas. >> that's right. let's go to texas, andrea, shall we? it continues to be a headache for republicans in the state of texas. yesterday, executive director of texas, texas republican party, looked to clarify her party's stance on the issue. she had kind of a complicated interview where she hemmed and heyed and talked about how women were too busy. we'll show you that in a moment. this is what she said. men are better negotiators.
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i would encourage women, instead of pursuing the courts for action, to become better negotiators. [ laughter ] >> who's she hanging around with? >> better negotiators. >> women have been -- >> i think the woman is so -- >> this is a woman trying to make up for what the woman said -- so let me -- i will be self-serving and shallow here and say i wrote a book on "negotiating," and if you want to be a better negotiator, read "knowing your value." let me tell you, that has nothing to do with the pathetic way that women are paid compared to their male counterparts, and there does need to be a national conversation, and perhaps policy in place, and acts like the lily led better act. if anyone in texas or anyone else in the republican party has a better idea, just like with obamacare, come to the table with it. otherwise, i would be quiet. i would, no offense, but it's not helping you. at all. be the winning party that wants
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to bring women in and make them feel included. even if you don't mean it. i suggest as a pr campaign, make sure you act like you do. this comes after a very awkward interview by the head of red state women, a republican superpac aimed at recruiting female voters. in that interview, she tries to plain greg abbott's position on equal pay. >> if you look at it, women are extremely busy. we lead busy lives, whether we're working professionally or from home, and times are -- are extremely -- extremely busy. it's a busy cycle for women, and we've got a lot to juggle. and so, when we look at this issue, we think what's practical. and we want more access to jobs. we want to be able to go to get a higher education degree, at the same time that we're working
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or raising a family. that's common sense. and we believe that that real world solution is a more practical way to approach the problem. >> oh, my god. >> what do you think, andrea? >> well, i think i'm very busy. you know, i'm very busy. >> i have to put on my lipstick. don't pay me more. >> no, no, but i'm too busy. i want to get a higher education degree while i work here. >> can i make a point? can i make a point that the lily ledbetter act, it didn't require people necessary to pay everyone equal wages. what it said was you get more legal avenues to sue for equal wages. so i don't know what time constraints have anything to do with the lily ledbetter act. this goes back several years now. if you remember during the 2012 campaign, mitt romney's campaign had a real difficulty answering the question on where he stood on the act. this is something i agree with you, mika, the republican party
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needs to understand where -- this is not some side issue. this is an issue of economic fairness, economic justice, and it's pervasive. >> coming up on "morning joe," louisiana's former governor would like his old job back, but he's barred from running since he spent eight years in federal prison. his solution? run for congress. that's ahead in the morning papers. first, here's dylan drier with a check on the forecast. >> good morning, mika. good morning, everyone. it's the last day of winter. there is a light at the end of the tunnel. spring starts tomorrow. some areas not really going to feel like it. in fact, it will cool off quite a bit. next week, we're looking at temperatures in the 30s. let's ignore that for now. rain back through chicago, making things a bit messy for this morning's commute as the water piles up on the roadways. we also have snow across parts of minnesota into wisconsin. that will eventually come to an end as we go into this afternoon. another couple of inches possible on top of what's already on the ground. so we do still have winter weather advisories in that area.
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another 1 to 3 inches on the 5 to 7 that's on the ground now. and then it moves eastward. so the ski resorts staying open a lot longer than in past years. that's always a good thing, central, northern new england, should end up with 6, maybe 12 inches in spots. elsewhere across the country, it does look like a pretty decent day. we should get into the 40s in the northeast. 60s down through the south. and 70s across the gulf coast states. and then, tomorrow, the first day of spring, actually a lot of places looking like it. 55 in new york city. we should be in the 60s back through the midwest. certainly something to look forward to tomorrow. we are going to be right back. you're watching "morning joe." ameriprise asked people a simple question: can you keep your lifestyle in retirement?
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time now to look at the morning papers. from our parade of papers, "the seattle times" investigators are trying to figure out what caused a television news helicopter to crash in seattle yesterday. the chopper fell into the street and exploded near the space needle. the helicopter hit three cars upon impact, igniting spilled fuel on the street. two people were killed in the crash, and a third person was badly hurt. "the northerly times" covering the greatest race in this coverage, ed edwards is planning to run for congress. >> what? >> the news comes three years after the 86-year-old former governor was released from prison. >> didn't he serve nine years?
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>> a nine-year sentence. he was framed for racketeering. he acknowledged his shortcomings during a press conference on monday. >> i've given a great deal of thought to this. i've read articles and pundits from people who suggested what i should and should not do. and i acknowledge there are good reasons why i should not run. i know that. but there are better reasons why i should. and good reasons have to give way to better reasons. therefore, i will be a candidate for congress from the 6th congressional district this year. >> he's going to need votes, because he can't vote for himself, right? >> right. he's a convicted felon. >> listen, we should cover this race. >> oh, we will. >> we need more people in politics like edwards. a 36-year-old wife, his third marriage. a 2-year-old child. he's 86, running for congress. go, ed edwards! >> okay. i'm just going to move on.
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the "washington post" is out with new reporting on the nsa's eavesdropping abilities. according to the "post" the agency has the system capable of listening in on 100% of a foreign country's phone calls. it's called mystic and gives analysts the ability to rewind those calls up to a month after they're initially recorded. this allows the nsa to revisit conversations they didn't deem important at the time. a senior manager at the agency compared the expansive program to a time machine. and that ties into the top story in this morning's politico playbook. joining us now, chief white house correspondent for politico, mike allen. i guess, mike, you've got news on this and rand paul heading to uc berkley for a discussion about the nsa and privacy concerns. a preview? >> yeah, well, that's right, mika. and berkeley could be a tough crowd for rand paul, but he's taking a smart subject. he's taking on the nsa. but, mika, we have an exclusive
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he's going beyond that. we have a look at his rashes. and he's going to go beyond the nsa. he's going to attack for the first time the u.s. intelligence more broadly, specifically he's going to name the cia. he's going to say that senators have a fear of an intelligence community that rand paul will say is drunk with power, unrepentant and unincleared to relinquish power. rand paul will say he's worried and not sure who is in charge of the government. mika, making very strong, very wide charges about the strength of the intelligence community, something that might play quite well in berkeley. >> well, we'll see what happens during that speech and hear more what he has to say. thomas, quick question? >> no, i wanted to update us on louisiana. that state does allow its convicted felons to vote. >> so i'm so sorry. he can vote for himself. >> he has to vote for himself. >> yeah, good, good. >> want to make sure we get that
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point across. certain states it's different. >> a beloved figure. >> self-loved. >> no, beloved. >> politico's mike allen, thank you. up next, how a group of d.c. women are cutting through the gridlock in the nation's capital. "elle" magazine is out with its washington power list, and we'll break it down next on "morning joe." you do your swipe from anywhere thing, we'll be here at lifelock doing our thing: watching out for your identity, data breach or not. get lifelock protection and live life free. lactaid® is 100% real milk? right. real milk. but it won't cause me discomfort. exactly, no discomfort, because it's milk without the lactose. and it tastes? it's real milk! come on, would i lie about this? hello. [ female announcer ] lactaid. 100% real milk. no discomfort.
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cool. all right, here with us now, we have a theme in this show, knowing your value. editor in chief of "elle" magazine, robbie myers, very nice to meet you. she has washington's 2014 power list from "elle," and this is a great list. and i want you to go through it, because i was asking you what the "elle" demographic is. let's start by describing what an "elle" woman is. >> she's chic, of course. she's somebody who is very much interested in moving through the world in a powerful and interesting way. so, you know, we think of the "elle" woman who likes her substance with her style. sort of like you. >> so she's chic and busy. >> she's very busy. >> she's very busy. as are these ten women in washington, very busy doing things like making legislation happen. >> mm-hmm. let's go through the list. number one, cheryl mills. i don't know if she's number
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one. is she number one? >> they're all stars among equals. >> i like that. there isn't one -- it's just this is the list -- >> these are the ten women we think are making a difference. >> i know many of them, actually. let's start with cheryl and think what really struck you about her. >> well, i mean, you know, everybody's talking about whether or not hillary will run, and she's really in the inner circle. you know, the thing that struck us about all of the women is that they're very -- they're there to serve and they're very collaborative. you know, cheryl is among one of those people who's pretty well connected. >> what's so interesting is in the "wall street journal" today, cheryl mills, who -- you know what she did in her life and career with hillary clinton -- does not want hillary to run. >> she said something similar to us. she said, if she wants to run, she'll obviously support her. she said, i also want her to have a life. she's very close to her. >> capricia marshall, who i have
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worked with along the years and is an incredibly accomplished woman, so happy to see her on this list. tell us about her. >> she's sort of the consummate diplomat. >> literally. >> she is. she schools us and our readers on the importance of knowing your audience and making everybody feel comfortable. and that's sort of, you know, in her role what she does. >> one of the more interesting women on the list is a cop, kathleen lanier. >> i love her. >> she's great. she's great. she has unique respect pong the patrol force in the district of columbia. >> she does. and, also, i hope among my readers, because she has an interesting story. >> yeah. >> she was a teen mom. >> right. >> single mother, and literally worked her way up through the ranks. and now, she is running a police force that has actually dropped violent crime in the city, in washington, d.c. so quite accomplished. and, you know, excited about fashion. i mean, you know, that's one of the nice things that we're able to do is able to talk to these
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really powerful women about not having to abdicate their femininity, if you will. >> robbie, i'm curious how you were able to whittle this down. you know, when you go to d.c., you'll find a lot of powerful women. >> right. >> what was the criteria you were looking for? this is a diverse collection of ten very unique and powerful women. >> well, thank you for that. we're looking for diversity, and certainly unique and powerful women, but also those women who have something going on right now, and that are really sort of very much in the mix of things, like tandon, who runs c.a.p. you know, a think tank, and, i mean, she's doing a lot of research, and we actually did a survey with her about women in power. and women executive function and executive leadership last year. and we just, you know, we think she's great. of course, republican senator susan collins from maine who, you know, is just such an
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interesting person, but also really fundamental in helping break up the gridlock in washington, d.c., around the shutdown. right. >> also a very powerful and interesting woman who has her own perspectives politically. i couldn't help but notice, too, a shout-out to kayla tausche over at cnbc. >> oh, wow! >> and great, if i'm getting the glare on here -- our colleague over there. and maria shriver gets interviewed by her daughter, katherine. >> thank you for noticing. >> and a shot shot of torrey birch. >> and kim cranesly of politico, and what we like about her is she took a seat at the table. she literally walked in and sat down and said i want to be a part of this. >> tell me about teddy pritzker, i met with her a couple of times. >> she was just here. >> yeah. >> again, talk about a woman who
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has a seat at the table, penny pritzker, voted one of the most -- 100 most powerful women in the world by another magazine, "forbes," and she certainly has the president's ear. but, also, you know, yet another woman who is very interested in mentoring and helping other women and sharing power. so, you know, it's a very interesting conversation to be having this morning in light of what you were just talking about. >> what made you -- is this the first washington -- >> this is our fourth. >> okay. when you look at these women and you decide who gets on the list, it is accomplishment that tops it. >> well, yes. you know, it's sort of -- we think that power is sort of the ultimate chic thing right now. i mean, as always. i mean, we're looking at a list of powerful women in the ultimate power town, how do they accrue power. i mean, how do they use it, wield it. and, you know, how they're really making -- affecting change in washington and the wider world.
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>> i love it. the new issue of "elle" is out now. robbie myers, great to have you on the show. come back. >> thank you. >> let's do more together. up next, what's driving today's market. sarah eisen has "business before the bell." in the nation, we reward safe driving.
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yeah! nailed it! i got back to doing what i love. that's my daughter. hi sweetie! gotta dial it back a little bit on the rock climbing. one weekend can make all the difference. unlike the bargain brand, depend gives you the confidence of new fit-flex® protection. it's a smooth and comfortable fit with more lycra strands. it's our best protection. take your weekend on with a free sample at depend.com we need women to be better negotiators. we need to make sure they're at the table and they develop the same skill as men. that's not going to happen unless they're at the table. we need women to be ambitious and desiring of the jobs by paying them equally to men, not knowing they'll get jobs they'll be bade less to do. we'll be better negotiators if we're paid for it. in fact, we can do anything that men do, perhaps even better, with less risk involved, i.e.,
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the financial crisis. and actually get paid for it and negotiate better if we're given the opportunity to education and to better opportunities that work. and flexible work time. so you can fight the lily ledbetter act if you want to. i personally think it's fantastic and a great start, but you don't start it by saying we're busy and mentioning cycle three times. that's a big ouch. >> ms. mika taking america to the class. >> it was the cycle thing. >> yeah. that was earlier in the show we had the long discussion of politics of equal pay and the issue that's surfaced in the race for texas governor. now, we got a lot of tweets about the conversation. >> really? >> that you started earlier. >> are they mad? >> yes. we got this. btw, morning, mika, you don't need to apologize to anyone. are you absolutely right in standing up for women. more grease. you did say, i'm sorry, and then reversed course and then said, you know what, i went against my own recommendation -- >> because of robbie, knowing your value, don't apologize.
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don't go in there and have other reasons why you need a race, like your family or this or that. go in there with your value, right there, right in front of you. no apologizing. right? >> and this was one of the things we found out in the survey we did with the center forever american last year, is women underestimate their value. >> exactly. >> they don't do a good job of negotiating for themselves. >> one more tweet we have here. guys, you want to put it back in there? no? okay. there we go. women who perform higher should receive higher pay, not equal, same job. when people talk about that, mika, about the fact that they deserve more if they're doing more for a job, isn't there a foundational aspect that we're missing here, we're jumping over, kind of putting the cart before the horse, if those foundations don't already exist? if we look at the whole 70 cents on the dollar, woman getting 77 cents to a man's dollar. >> listen, the bottom line is you have to know what your number is. and there was -- we had somebody trying to back up a very poor statement by the -- a member of the republican party on equal pay.
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and she said women need to be better negotiators. and they do. actually. i mean, it's a very good point. a bad point in this argument. and i think that we ought to have an ongoing conversation as to how that can happen. actually tweet more questions and i'll do a whole segment with experts on negotiating tips for women, because i think we're very, very, very nervous to push ourselves forward. there's a lot of clutter in our brains. we're worried if the person in front of us feels uncomfortable. we're worried if you like -- if the person likes us. we're worried about things that don't matter. when you're actually negotiating money. so i think, actually, the debate we had, and some of the more stupid comments by people about equal pay have actually touched off a great conversation. >> more to be done with this, for sure. >> yeah. "business before the bell," we'll turn it over to cnbc's sarah eisen. let's talk about fed chair janet yellen. she started her two-day conference yesterday, and goosed
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the markets. we had a good monday. >> yeah, good monday. a good tuesday. can we make it a good wednesday? this is her first time as fed chairman leading a meeting, and also the first time she'll lead the all-important press conference where she takes questions from reporters. here's what economists are expecting. they do expect the fed to pare back, as they exit the stimulus they've put in place after the crisis. the big question today is going to be how she communicates when interest rates rise. remember, interest rates are super low, and the fed has previously said 6.5% unemployment would be a trigger for that. guess what? we're near 6.5% unemployment rate, but the labor market hasn't fully improved. so how will they switch up the language there? that will be a big question. >> real quickly, we want to get the breaking news in about toyota. that just crossed the wires shortly ago. >> said to pay $1 billion at least to settle these inquiries or investigations -- criminal
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probes -- related to safety four years ago. that's one of the highest fees ever to settle this. and it will end the criminal investigation. interesting, it's going on while general motors is dealing with its own problems on that front. >> yeah, pr issues for both companies. sarah, great to see you. >> great to see you. >> we're back with much "morning joe" after this. stick around. so i c an reach ally bank 24/7, but there are no branches? 24/7. i'm sorry, i'm just really reluctant to try new things. really? what's wrong with trying new things? look! mommy's new vacuum! (cat screech) you feel that in your muscles? i do... drink water. it's a long story. well, not having branches let's us give you great rates and service. i'd like that. a new way to bank. a better way to save. ally bank. your money needs an ally.
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new video out of crimea this
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morning. hundreds of pro-russian forces storming a ukrainian naval base. also this morning, this move just coming within day after ukrainian officer was shot and killed in the first violent outbreak in this three-week standoff. the a.p. reports that no shots were fired today. ukrainian servicemen, they do remain on guard outside the building as the forces raised the russian flag above the square, and it comes back to one person -- vladimir putin -- and what exactly he's looking to grain from the land grab. mika took a closer look at who this russian president is. >> i looked into putin's eyes and i see three letters -- a k, g, and a b. >> reporter: he's a product of the cold war that defined american policy for nearly 50 years. recruited by the kgb in 1975 after graduating from leningrad state university, vladimir putin worked his way through the spy agency's ranks, eventually retiring as a colonel in 1991. he then turned to a life in politics, but it wasn't until
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1999 when boris yeltsin appointed him prime minister that the world would find out who vladimir putin really is. since then, his mission has been clear -- wrapped in an ideology to restore russia to its former greatness, putin has positioned himself against the united states at nearly every turn. after the tragedy of 9/11, he opposed the war on terror. and more recently granted asylum to the nsa whistle-blower, edward snowden. the carnage in syria continues without any end in sight. up to 150,000 dead, all thanks in part to putin's support of bashar al assad. and last year, he wrote a scathing op-ed of american foreign policy saying military intervention is now commonplace for the united states. he also took a shot at the american people, writing, quote, it's extremely dangerous to encourage people to see themselves as exceptional,
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whatever the motivation. >> putin, big, strong, muscular, on a horse. >> big, strong, muscular on a horse? that's an image that looked like it should be airbrushed onto the side of a van in a new jersey rest area. >> reporter: putin is also a master of manipulation. carefully shaping his image as a strong, fearless leader of mother russia. he's a black belt in judo and isn't shy about showing off his skills. his machismo was on full display in 2008 when he saved a television crew from a siberian tiger. putin later admitted the rescue was staged. and in 2011, he made a remarkable discovery of two greek urns at the floor of the black sea. but soon after, russian officials fessed up, saying it was just another photo op. putin even has an online comic book series, "super putin," where he fights terror and
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public protests, and he's literally rewriting history, changing textbooks in russia to ensure he's remembered in a positive light. so now, as putin reclaims crimea for russia, the united states is faced with one question -- how do you respond to a tyrant that as some world leaders consider to be in another world? >> and i imagine there's probably a lot of disagreement among the top leaders, and putin may be showing himself to be more clumsy than we would have assumed. at the same time, we can say to the russians, look, it's neither your interests nor in our interests to reignite the cold war. >> fascinating look. the dna of putin. up next, what, if anything, did we learn today? we're back in a moment.
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and most of the country is looking nice and quiet today except for the western great lake, the upper plain, the upper midwest. that's where we will see some snow showers, especially through the morning, but those will tamer off this afternoon with about 3 to 6 inches of snow, likely out of that whole storm system. in new york and washington, d.c., some late-day rain showers, highs in the 40s. nlimi. hey, you're not the charles barkley? yes i am. nah charles barkley is way taller. there's my picture on the wall. yeah that could be anyone. what about my jersey over there? oh yeah, that's your jersey. there's my bobble head right behind you. alright well let me see you bobble. yeah, i'm just not buying it man. earn unlimited double miles with no blackout dates from the capital one venture card. my brother john, he works here. john, you know this guy? what's in your wallet? salegets up to 795 highwayeal's the passamiles per tank.sel salesperson #2: actually, we're throwing in a $1,000 fuel reward card. we've never done that.
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♪ my favorite last night, the favorite dance of the night, was definitely from "star wars" actor billy dee williams. whew! [ cheers ] buckle up. this is a great one. check him out. ♪ [ laughter ] [ applause ]
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>> oh! ahh! >> i guess that explains the name's new name "dancing next to the stars." we have a great show tonight! it's time to talk about what we learned today. barnicle, keep it clean. >> okay, i will. i learned that one of the top five moments of the "daily rundown" is about to occur, because chuck todd is going to have former governor, form congressman, former inmate ed edwards. 86 years old, running for congress. >> how did he do that? >> because he's chuck todd. >> 7-month-old. >> huh? >> an 86-year-old with a 7-month-old. >> and still questions about the missing malaysian flight, and what are the true intentions of vladimir putin going forward? we are as an international community stuck with him as the president of russia for four more years. >> yeah. >> so we have to figure out his true intentions.
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>> stay tuned to msnbc. we'll have continuing coverage on the missing plane as well as the developments in ukraine. two major stories that are ongoing and have especially in ukraine an impact on the world that we live in as we go forward. what time is it? when it's way too early, it's time for "morning joe." now, it's time for "the daily rundown" with chuck todd. have a great day. ♪ cold war weariness as pro-russian forces grab a naval base in ukraine. vice president biden tries to reassure nervous neighbors that crimea's course cannot stand. also this morning, one year after national republican leaders laid out a tough take on their own party's failings, the party says they've made some progress. chairman reince priebus is here. plus, amy katz is here with president obama's march madness bracket, and this year, there's more politics invo

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